The Doodle is in the Detail with Grace Du Prez

“I’m always drawn to trying new materials and I love creating tactile surfaces,” says Grace Du Prez. A mixed media designer based in London, England, Grace was drawn to the 3Doodler as an experimental new medium.

Grace is no stranger to using unconventional materials in her design pieces. “My previous work has involved lots of surface design techniques including digital embroidery and fabric manipulation,” she explains, “as well as the use of many unusual materials from leather to human hair, and even Mini Cheddars!”

With the wide range of colors available, and having the ability to control the final texture of the plastic, Grace was immediately drawn to the 3Doodler. “It was really interesting to start working with plastic as a medium and exploring all the different effects you can create,” she says.

"It was really interesting to start working with plastic as a medium and exploring all the different effects you can create."

Her very first project—a Peacock Hat for Ladies’ Day at Royal Ascot—was certainly a head-turner, and earned her multiple headlines and accolades. “This was the very first time I had used 3Doodler,” Grace says, “so I learnt a lot in a very short amount of time!”

Peacock Hat for Ladies' Day at Royal Ascot

The completed hat took over 60 hours, all Doodled in the span of a week. “There were also a couple of days spent doing the initial designing,” Grace says. “The hat was made up of three different size feathers, all with three colours in them. Each one varied from around 15-30 minutes to make.”

Whether Doodling fanciful hats or fancy jewelry, Grace says it’s not as simple as picking up a 3Doodler and drawing away. “My design process is quite experimental and there is always an element of trial and development,” she explains. “I often start with a mood-board and a brainstorm of ideas.”

Then Grace moves on to drawing out her concepts. “I will draw a few basic sketches of the silhouette and then work out the templates using CAD,” she says. “Designing on the computer works well for me as I can easily make alterations and work out the exact scale. I can also try out different colour options.”

From those plans, Grace then creates a paper model by printing the templates from the computer models. “At this point I can see if it will work logistically,” she says. “For the final part of the planning process, I Doodle a test piece to see how it will look and make adjustments where needed. This step can be repeated several times so that each part works perfectly.”

The results are stunning pieces that reflect her careful planning and meticulous execution.

Sometimes, Grace says, ideas from one project will inspire something completely different. “I’ve just finished a vase that is totally waterproof,” she says. “It’s made of multiple circular layers all joined together—the same principle as a bracelet I previously made.”

After creating the bracelet, Grace says she was inspired by the clear plastic and the circular shapes. “It’s functional and the clear plastic looks really beautiful through the water,” she says. “I applied a layer of clear silicon to the inside surface to make it watertight.”

For Grace, the 3Doodler seems the perfect tool for her artistic and design ideas. “I like that the 3Doodler combines modern technology and yet is still very hands on,” she says. “The making process is integral to me as a designer and I like my work to have a hand made quality.”

And while Grace is now an expert at using the 3Doodler to its highest potential, she says there’s always more to learn. “I’m always getting new ideas for projects,” she says, “and there are still lots of techniques I’d like to try!”

See more of Grace’s work on her website.

Shaping the Surreal with Yudi Marton

One of the first artists to use the 3Doodler, Yudi Marton lives in Haifa, Israel and caught our attention with his incredible surrealist sculptures. No stranger to creative curiosity, Yudi was among the first to explore the world of computer generated digital artwork more than 25 years ago.

This same instinct is what initially piqued his interest in our original Kickstarter campaign. After backing the world’s first 3D printing pen, Yudi explored new and innovative uses for the 3Doodler, using multiple pens to produce incredibly creative and detailed sculptures.

Yudi spends 30 hours on average for each piece

At 61 years old, Yudi has had a lifetime of creative experience to prepare him for new and emerging creative technologies.

"The 3Doodler is a natural drawing tool for me, it allows me to both draw and sculpt."

“I’ve been an artist for as long as I can recall,” he says. “For most of that time I worked with ball point drawings or sculpture using wood, soft stone, or clay. The 3Doodler is a natural drawing tool for me, it allows me to both draw and sculpt, transitioning into using it was an intuitive motion.”

Seated Couple

Yudi’s sculptures take on average 30 hours to complete, but more complicated figures can take much longer. “‘Seated Couple’ actually took almost 60 hours in total,” Yudi says. “This is the reasoning behind having multiple pens, it allows me to switch them out during longer sessions without losing momentum.”

While Yudi’s sculptures look like they come straight from his fantastic imagination, each one requires careful planning. “I build each project from many different parts which are then fused together,” he explains. “These parts are often made up of series of rings which are combined to create a wireframe of the intended character.”

And even with advance planning, Yudi says there’s always unexpected twists in the creative process. “More often than not, things don’t always go as I planned and I need to break, bend and twist before getting the forms correct,” he says. “For instance, ‘The Jump’ was done by breaking the figure many different times in order to achieve the sense of movement in the final product.”

The Jump

Yudi’s personal artistic style wasn’t always the same – it evolved over years of creative expression. “I became comfortable with my technique mostly through experimentation and persistence,” he says. “You need to have a lot of patience, but even the learning process is fun and ultimately rewarding.”

Yudi Martin's Crown Tower Trilogy

To stay current with Yudi’s upcoming work and exhibition be sure to check out his home page.